Abstract

Agencies and Industry to rethink how national security systems and other complex systems have been developed, fielded and supported to meet the warfighter’s needs. The Department of Defense (DoD) is at a critical point where it must transform its business model for acquiring and maintaining these systems to reduce costs and develop joint interoperable systems that adopt and exploit open system design principles and architectures. Effective November 15, 2010, DoD directed that Program Managers conduct of a business case analysis, in consort with the engineering tradeoff analysis that will be presented at MS B. The business case analysis will outline the open systems architecture approach, combined with technical data rights the government will pursue in order to ensure a lifetime consideration of competition in the acquisition of weapon systems. The results of this analysis will be reported in the Acquisition Strategy Report and in the competition strategy.

At the same time, there have been significant changes in research and development such as the emergent globalized nature of technology development in addition to shorter schedules and less funding available for new technology development.

Agencies and Industry to rethink how national security systems and other complex systemshave been developed, fielded and supported to meet the warfighter’s needs. The Department of Defense (DoD) is at a critical point where it must transform its business model for acquiring and maintaining these systems to reduce costs and develop joint interoperable systems that adopt and exploit open system design principles and architectures. Effective November 15, 2010, DoD directed that Program Managers conduct of a business case analysis, in consort with the engineering tradeoff analysis that will be presented at MS B. The business case analysiswill outline the open systems architecture approach, combined with technical data rightsthe government will pursue in order to ensure a lifetime consideration of competition in the acquisition of weapon systems. The results of this analysis will be reported in theAcquisition Strategy Report and in the competition strategy.

At the same time, there have been significant changes in research and development suchas the emergent globalized nature of technology development in addition to shorterschedules and less funding available for new technology development.

Speaker

Dr. Snoderly was the President of International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) from 2002-2004. He is the current 2011 Chairman of the INCOSE Foundation. In March of 2008 he received the recognition as an INCOSE Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP). He is Co-Author of the 1994 IEEE 1220 Systems Engineering Standard. He received a Doctor of Public Administration Degree from USC in December of 1996. He received a Masters Degree in Public Administration from USC in May 1995. He also holds a Master Degree in Systems Management from USC in 1973 and a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering from WVU in 1963.

From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Snoderly was a part time Associate Professor at George Mason University School of Management. He conducted an executive postgraduate level seminar for Chief Information Officers and a course on Program Management for the GMU Masters of Technology Management program’s 2003 fall semester.

Dr. Snoderly is currently the Program Learning Director of Systems Engineering at the Defense Acquisition University. He is responsible for the development of SE courses as well as providing instruction on management of the Systems Engineering aspects of the Department of Defense systems acquisition process.

Prior to joining DSMC (now DAU) in 1979, Professor Snoderly was the Deputy Program Manager for the U.S. Navy LAMPS MK III Program at the Naval Air Systems Command. Professor Snoderly has 16 years of engineering and management experience working for the U.S. Navy as a civilian engineer. His recommendations were instrumental in the development and fielding of the Navy LAMPS MK III weapons system.

Cost: $20